Where should you go on safari in Africa?  The choices seem bamboozling at first - Kenya, Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Botswana, South Africa...  All are amazing and have their own unique angles and experiences, but I'm going to share a few reasons why I think you should consider one of my favourite safari destinations - Namibia.  If my photos below don't convince you, consider these five reasons why Namibia should be on your bucket list.



IMG_8756 Don't ask me why, but even if you're not the kind of person who tends to do random jumps in the sky, Namibia's vast sands will make you want to



1) Safety.

Namibia is one of the safest countries you can go on an African safari.  A whole lot of people don't realise that there are less safe countries to visit in Africa (Nigeria, Congo and parts of West Africa spring to mind) and there are much safer countries, like Namibia.  In my opinion, the two safest places to travel in Africa are Namibia and Botswana, partly because of their low human populations, and secondly because you don't get the same kind of crime that you get in some other countries (like South Africa).    Namibia is fabulous for families and first timers to Africa.  We always used to call it "Africa For Beginners".  Lots of people do self drive safaris there because the roads are good and the scenery is spectacular.

Desert elephants in Namibia.  These are savannah elephants with special adaptations to life in the desert. Desert elephants in Namibia. These are savannah elephants with special adaptations to life in the desert.



2) Space.

Most of us live in a world that is full of people living in close proximity to each other.  We are constantly bombarded with commercialism and consumerism, bright lights, loud noises, all those things that are part of capitalistic life in the modern world.  Namibia's desert is the opposite of all that.  There's something about being miles from anyone else, enveloped by vast spaces and enormous skies, that provides a unique kind of escapism.  For me, it's a place I can breathe.

Zebras are one of the more commonly seen species in Etosha National Park, Namibia Zebras are one of the more commonly seen species in Etosha National Park, Namibia



3) Conservation.

More than half of Namibia is under conservation protection.  I mean, think about that.  It's amazing.  Australia's only got about 12% under protection.  It's not all national parks in that 50%+ under protection in Namibia, although at almost 20% in national parks that's a big chunk too.  The key is all the communal conservancies managed and legally run by the local ethnic groups.  Namibia is one of the finest examples of community-based conservation you'll find on the planet and tourism is a big part of that success story.  In Namibia they've really got their head around giving local communities benefits from the wildlife, and that translates back to their excellent conservation record.  If you book an ethical safari through Matson & Ridley Safaris, you're directly contributing to this conservation success.  Read more about Namibia's community-based conservation at the website of the Namibia Nature Foundation.

Springboks form large herds during the wet season in Namibia Springboks form large herds during the wet season in Namibia



4) Unique wildlife

The safari experience you get in Namibia is like no other.  You won't get all of the 'Big Five' (lion, leopard, buffalo, elephant, rhino) on your first game drive.  Namibia's about quality, not quantity.  What you will get is a single, regal, solitary oryx antelope standing on the desert dunes at sunset.  You'll get tall, white elephants in Etosha (in the dry season), coloured that way because of the white dust flung off the enormous pan.  You'll get tiny lizards that dance to stop their feet overheating on the boiling hot sand, and desert beetles with tiny ridges on their backs that trap the moisture from fog rolling in from the coast by standing into the wind on a ridge of sand.  What you get there is unique desert-adapted wildlife in huge landscapes that even dwarf elephants.

Oryx at the Skeleton Coast, which I'll be visiting with a group in May 2016 Oryx at the Skeleton Coast, which I'll be visiting with a group in May 2016



5) Variety

On a single safari, you can experience the sandy orange dunes in the Namib Desert, the red, rocky volcanic landscapes of Damaraland in the north west, thorny bush lands and of course the famous Etosha salt pan fringed by short grasslands.  In the north east you get big flowing rivers and in Bushmanland you get ancient, towering baobab trees.  It's incredibly diverse.  You do have to cover a bit of distance as it's a big country, but your money goes a long way in Namibia.  There are also at least 11 ethnic groups in Namibia, from the traditional ovaHimba people to the cattle-focused Hereros and the San Bushmen.

Meeting the local people while on safari is always a highlight, especially in areas where they benefit from the dollars you're paying to visit them Meeting the local people while on safari is always a highlight, especially in areas where they benefit from the dollars you're paying to visit them



I've got a few places left on my north west Namibia safari in May 2016, and only 1 spot for a single male for this year's Namibian safari in September, so get in touch if you'd like to experience this amazing part of Africa with me.  Alternatively, drop me a line if you'd like to book your own self-drive or fly-in safari in Namibia and I'll plan an itinerary for you and your family that gives you your dream safari while making a difference in conservation.  Namibia's worth it, trust me!

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2015-04-29 13:30:51
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